SUWA Action Alerts Archives - Page 3 of 26


  • June 22nd, 2017

    Acting in lockstep with the Trump administration’s relentless onslaught against federal public lands, the BLM is proposing to offer at the agency’s December 2017 oil and gas lease sale 79 parcels for leasing and development on approximately 100,000 acres of federal public lands in eastern and central Utah. Included in this list are parcels along the western edge of the San Rafael Swell and immediately adjacent to Dinosaur National Monument.

    Leasing in the San Rafael Swell
    For the third time in five years, the BLM is proposing to offer leases in the Molen Reef region of the western San Rafael Swell—an area with high cultural and archaeological density and outstanding recreational opportunities.  The BLM’s initial decision to offer these leases in 2013 drew immediate and widespread criticism, including a large public protest in front of the agency’s state headquarters in Salt Lake City. Ultimately, the agency determined that it did not have enough information regarding cultural and archaeological resources to justify leasing the area for oil and gas development.  In 2015, the BLM once again deferred leasing in the Molen Reef region, citing the continuing need to gather more cultural and archaeological resource information.

    To date, the agency has still not completed those cultural resource inventories.  In fact, the BLM admits it has surveyed at most only 2.9 percent of the proposed parcels and thus is in no stronger a position to justify leasing now than it was in 2013.  The agency’s leasing flip-flop is a disservice to this remarkable wilderness-caliber landscape and its thousands of known—and yet to be discovered—cultural resources.

    View of lease area in the western San Rafael Swell (Eagle Canyon/Molen Reef region). Copyright Ray Bloxham/SUWA.

    Leasing on the Doorstep of Dinosaur National Monument
    In a return to the Bush administration’s scorched earth approach to oil and gas leasing in the Uinta Basin, the BLM is also proposing to offer leases immediately adjacent to Dinosaur National Monument.  This ill-advised proposal would green-light oil and gas development right next to the monument, including along the primary access route travelled by thousands of visitors annually.  In fact, one of the parcels proposed for sale was previously offered at BLM’s infamous December 2008 oil and gas lease sale and later withdrawn from sale by Interior Secretary Ken Salazar after a successful lawsuit by SUWA and others blocked its issuance.

    In a letter to the BLM, the National Park Service has objected to the leasing proposal, citing the adverse impacts to air quality, viewsheds, dark night skies, water quality, and natural soundscapes.

    The BLM is currently accepting public comments on its oil and gas leasing proposal.  With your help we were able to fight off earlier attempts to auction off public lands in these areas to private industrial development—and we will do so again.  Our public lands deserve better than this.  Please make your voice heard by submitting comments today.

    >> Click here to comment on the San Rafael Swell Lease parcels
    >> Click here to comment on the Dinosaur National Monument lease parcels

  • June 13th, 2017

    Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s interim report on the fate of Bears Ears National Monument was released yesterday—and it isn’t good.

    As expected, Zinke recommends that President Trump dramatically shrink the boundaries of Bears Ears National Monument—though he doesn’t say specifically by how much, or where. Instead, he punted the details of how he’ll recommend Trump chop up the monument to his final report, due in August.

    The fact is, the president doesn’t have the authority to reduce the monument. Any attempt by Trump to reduce Bears Ears would immediately wind up in court.

    But there’s still time to defend Bears Ears. And now that Zinke has made his intentions clear, your voice is more important than ever.

    Click here to submit your comments now.

    Bears Ears cultural site. Copyright Tim Peterson

    Despite virtually ignoring previous public comments which favored keeping Bears Ears intact by a 9-1 margin, Secretary Zinke has extended the comment period for Bears Ears. Even if you’ve commented before, now is your chance to tell Zinke what you think of his plan to drastically reduce Bears Ears National Monument.

    Remind Secretary Zinke that:

    •  The President doesn’t have the authority to modify the monument’s boundaries. Only Congress can do that.

    •  Bears Ears National Monument was a significant achievement for the historic coalition of Tribes that came together to advocate for its protection.

    •  It is the first national monument to include traditional knowledge as an object worthy of protection in the monument proclamation. And every inch of Bears Ears is necessary to preserve the more than 100,000 archaeological sites therein.

    •  It is a remarkable wilderness landscape. Beyond the monument’s namesake twin buttes are world-renowned wilderness treasures like White Canyon, Indian Creek, and Comb Ridge. Myriad plant and animal species thrive in its varied habitats. And you’d be hard pressed to find the solitude provided by these areas elsewhere in the lower 48.

    Secretary Zinke tried to mask the brutality of his recommendation by calling on Congress to make parts of Bears Ears a National Conservation Area and to give Tribes co-management of whatever crumbs remain of the monument after Trump dices it up. But that’s not just kicking the can down the road—that’s kicking it into the abyss. Congress has had 111 years to protect Bears Ears, and it has completely failed to do so.

    Please, take a moment today to let Secretary Zinke know what you think about his plans for Bears Ears.

    Thank you for taking action.

  • June 1st, 2017

    Sunset Arch in GSENM. Photo (c) James Kay.

    You stood up in defense of Bears Ears National Monument.  Now we need you to do the same for Grand Staircase-Escalante.

    Over the last few weeks, you helped deluge the Department of Interior with more than 685,000 comments in support of Bears Ears.  Thank you to everyone who took action!  This extraordinary show of support would not be possible without your individual action.

    The outrageously short 15 day comment period for Bears Ears has now closed.

    But the Department of Interior is still accepting comments on the future of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, as well as 25 additional national monuments around the country.

    Please write today to help save Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument!

    Even if you mentioned Grand Staircase-Escalante when you wrote earlier on Bears Ears, please write again.  This will help ensure your comment on Grand Staircase-Escalante is counted.

    You can access the Department of Interior’s official comment form here.

    Your comments are desperately needed!  The Trump administration appears serious about eviscerating Grand Staircase-Escalante Monument.  The Utah delegation is pressing the president to carve out a huge chunk of the 1.7 million acre monument for potential coal mining.  And Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke seems to be listening!  His visit to the monument in May focused on a driving tour to a coal seam!

    It is important that your comments be in your own words. The Department of Interior will count them individually that way. What is most useful is your own statement about why Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is special to you and why ALL OF IT deserves to be protected.  It’s fine if you keep it simple and from the heart.

    To help you gather your thoughts, here are a few points of information (you can also click here to view our story map):

    •    Grand Staircase-Escalante was designated in 1996. Since then, it has come to be known as the “Science Monument”—yielding several new species of dinosaur and other paleontological finds and providing habitat for 650 bee species, many that are endemic to the area.

    •    Grand Staircase-Escalante has incredible camping, hiking and other recreational opportunities. Places like Calf Creek, Peekaboo and Spooky Canyon, Coyote Gulch, and the Hole in the Rock Road are known the world over. If you have your own favorites, be sure to mention them!

    •    Polling shows more than half of Utahns want Grand Staircase-Escalante left alone. That’s added to the more than 80 percent of Westerners that the Colorado College Conservation in the West poll showed want existing national monuments left intact.

    •    Reviewing any monument is a political act, but especially when it involves one that is more than two decades old and flourishing. No president has ever taken this needless step, and neither should President Trump.

    The comment period for Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument closes on July 10.  But please take a moment and write now.  We want to show strong support prior to the anniversary of the Antiquities Act on June 8!

    To make sure your comment is properly tallied, please send us a copy.  You can do that easily by:

    • Clicking on “I want to provide my contact information” on the DOI comment form;
    • Clicking on “Email Receipt” at step 3;
    • Forwarding the email you receive from regulations.gov to issues-action@suwa.org

    Thanks for taking action.

  • May 18th, 2017

    Last week, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke came to Utah to “review” Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments — and SUWA supporters were on the ground to meet him in force.

    The day before he arrived, more than 3,000 people rallied at the State Capitol in Salt Lake City to show their support for Utah’s wild lands and monuments. More than 500 showed up the next day at the BLM offices while Sec. Zinke held a perfunctory meeting with tribes. And when he showed up at Butler Wash Ruin in the middle of Bears Ears National Monument, nearly 70 supporters were on hand with signs and banners urging him to leave our monuments alone. An additional 300 people rallied the next day in Kanab to show their support for Grand Staircase-Escalante.

    But even though Sec. Zinke has left the state, we can’t let up — we need to bring the message directly to him and to President Trump to leave our monuments alone. That’s why SUWA is running full page ads today in both The New York Times and The Washington Post.

    Click on the image above to see the ad in full (opens in PDF).

    Although Zinke’s “listening tour” was decidedly one-sided, we’re not going to leave anything on the field in our efforts to protect our monuments — and to convince President Trump and Ryan Zinke to ignore the caterwauling of Utah politicians and leave Bears Ears and Grand Staircase intact.

    Help us keep up the fight to protect Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante by making a contribution today!

    We rely on your continued support to keep up this fight — on the ground, in the courts, and in the media.

    Thank you for standing up for the redrock.

    Also, if you haven’t already done so, please submit your public comment to Sec. Zinke about Bears Ears! The comment period ends a week from today! SUWA.org/comment

  • May 12th, 2017

    President Trump has declared war on Utah’s national monuments. Now is the time to act.

    President Trump’s April 26th Executive Order requires a “review” of national monuments dating back to 1996. This bureaucratic speak hides the administration’s real intention: dismantling the protections put in place for our nation’s most treasured public lands. Included in the review are dozens of monuments across the country, but the bookends of the timeline are Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante and Bears Ears National Monuments, making it clear that they are the prime targets.

    The Department of Interior is now accepting comments to gauge public support for these monuments.

    Help us save Utah’s monuments! Please click here to submit your comments and we’ll deliver them to the Department of Interior. We are collecting comments ourselves so we can ensure an accurate accounting of supportive comments to add to national totals.

    Utah has been under siege from politicians hostile to protecting its wilderness for decades, but this action marks the most sweeping threat to the preservation of Utah’s protected wildlands. What’s worse, the Bears Ears comment period is a mere 15 days, meaning we need everyone to act quickly.

    Click here to submit your comments now.

    It’s important that comments be in your own words—the Department of Interior will count them individually that way. But to help you gather your thoughts, let us remind you of what’s at stake.

    Bears Ears:
    •    Bears Ears National Monument was a significant achievement. President Obama protected the 1.3 million-acre monument in December at the urging of a historic coalition of five Tribes that had come together to advocate for its protection.

    •    It is the first national monument to include traditional knowledge as an object worthy of protection in the monument proclamation. And every inch of Bears Ears is necessary to preserve the more than 100,000 archaeological sites therein.

    •    Bears Ears must never be shrunk nor repealed. If anything, the monument is not big enough. The Tribes had requested almost 600,000 more acres for protection. The whole tribal proposal should have been made a monument.

    •    It is a remarkable wilderness landscape. Beyond the monument’s namesake twin buttes are world-renowned wilderness treasures like White Canyon, Indian Creek, and Comb Ridge. Myriad plant and animal species thrive in its varied habitats. And you’d be hard pressed to find the solitude provided by these areas elsewhere else in the lower 48.

    Grand Staircase-Escalante:
    •    Grand Staircase-Escalante was designated in 1996. Since then, it has come to be known as the “Science Monument”—yielding several new species of dinosaur and other paleontological finds and providing habitat for 650 bee species, many that are endemic to the area.

    •    Grand Staircase-Escalante has incredible camping, hiking and other recreational opportunities. Places like Calf Creek, Peekaboo and Spooky Canyon, Coyote Gulch, and the Hole in the Rock Road are known the world over. If you have your own favorites, be sure to mention them!

    •    Polling shows more than half of Utahns want Grand Staircase-Escalante left alone. That’s added to the more than 80 percent of Westerners that the Colorado College Conservation in the West poll showed want existing national monuments left intact.

    •    Reviewing any monument is a political act, but especially when it involves one that is more than two decades old and flourishing. No president has ever taken this needless step, and neither should President Trump.

    Please consider all of these points as you make your comments, and make sure to add your own! Tell the Department of Interior what makes these monuments so special.

    We know this will take more time than usual, but it’s extremely important. Tell Secretary Zinke and President Trump that Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante are here to stay!

    Thank you for all you do. We can’t do this without you.

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