Terri Martin, Author at Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance - Page 2 of 2


  • September 23rd, 2014
    Paleoindian Images from Secrets of the Past

    Click image to learn more

    12,000-year-old encampments of ice age mammoth hunters.  Ghostly, life-sized figures staring down from towering sandstone cliffs.  Hundreds upon hundreds of stone ruins clinging to canyon walls.

    These are just some of the remarkable artifacts that make Greater Canyonlands a treasure trove of scientific and historical knowledge.

    Tell President Obama to protect Greater Canyonlands and its extraordinary historical resources.

    Today, SUWA and the Greater Canyonlands Coalition have released a new publication, “Secrets of the Past in a Rugged Land.”

    Written by noted archaeologist Jerry Spangler, the publication takes the reader through the 12,000 years of human history embedded in Greater Canyonlands, offering highlights of the artifacts left behind by ancient inhabitants.

    Making the “archaeological case” for proclaiming Greater Canyonlands a national monument, the publication calls for presidential action to protect the area’s cultural treasures from harm.

    On our website, you can read the publication (opens in PDF) or watch a slideshow featuring highlights from the publication.

    Then, send President Obama an email asking him to protect Greater Canyonlands to preserve this irreplaceable outdoor museum.

  • September 23rd, 2014
    Secrets of the Past (cover image)

    Click image to view and download booklet.

    12,000-year-old encampments of ice age mammoth hunters.  Ghostly, life-sized figures staring down from towering sandstone cliffs.  Hundreds upon hundreds of stone ruins clinging to canyon walls. These are just some of the remarkable artifacts that make Greater Canyonlands a treasure trove of scientific and historical knowledge.

    Today, SUWA and the Greater Canyonlands Coalition have released a new publication, “Secrets of the Past in a Rugged Land.” 

Written by noted archaeologist Jerry Spangler, the publication takes the reader through the 12,000 years of human history embedded in Greater Canyonlands, offering highlights of the artifacts left behind by ancient inhabitants.

    Making the “archaeological case” for proclaiming Greater Canyonlands a national monument, the publication calls for presidential action to protect the area’s cultural treasures from harm.

    Click here to read the publication (opens in PDF) or watch a slideshow featuring highlights from the publication, below. 

Then, send President Obama an email asking him to protect Greater Canyonlands to preserve this irreplaceable outdoor museum.

    Slideshow
    Hover over the image to view caption. Click on the right arrow to advance.
     

    For media inquiries, email Terri Martin.

  • August 15th, 2014

    As the 50th Anniversary of Canyonlands National Park approaches next month, Utahns and others across the country are pushing for President Obama to declare the 1.8 million acres of public lands surrounding the park as a Greater Canyonlands National Monument.

    To illustrate the importance of protecting Greater Canyonlands for future generations, groups of young people and college students have created a series of short films shot in the area.  Two have been released so far, with more to be posted in the weeks ahead.

    The first in this series features students from Brigham Young University (BYU):

    BYU GC Video (screenshot)

    When Utah high school student Kelsey Oliver learned about the campaign to convince President Obama to protect Greater Canyonlands she leapt into action, organizing a student excursion to the area:

    Rowland Hall GC Video (screenshot)

    After you’ve watched the videos, please take a moment to tell President Obama your reasons for protecting Greater Canyonlands.

     

  • July 22nd, 2014
    Mother & Daugher (Lin Alder)

    Copyright Lin Alder.

    More than 200 health and well-being professionals from Utah released a letter today asking President Obama to protect Greater Canyonlands – the magnificent wild region surrounding Canyonlands National Park in Utah – as a national monument because of the health benefits to all Americans.

    The letter states “Protecting this world-class landscape would not only preserve an area of unparalleled scenic beauty and rich cultural heritage, it would also foster a healthy America. That is a goal anyone can support.”

    The list of signers included doctors, nurses, mental health professionals, physical and occupational therapists, medical aides and technicians, public health specialists, health educators, dieticians and other healers and well-being practitioners.

    The letter stressed that protecting Greater Canyonlands would provide physical, psychological and public health benefits.

    “We need big beautiful landscapes like Greater Canyonlands to inspire people and their families to get outside and be active,” said Mark Oliver, M.D., father of two children and an avid outdoorsman. “Americans’ increasingly sedentary lifestyles exacerbate conditions such as heart disease, obesity and diabetes which plague huge numbers of our population.”

    “Large wild places like Greater Canyonlands can be critically important to the emotional healing and rejuvenation of people who have suffered trauma, struggle with anxiety or depression, or simply face emotional challenges,” said Travis Mickelson, M.D., and specialist in Pediatric Behavioral Health Psychiatry. “Studies also show that time in natural settings enhances people’s problem-solving skills, concentration and creativity.”

    “The public health benefits of protecting Greater Canyonlands extend far beyond its borders,” said Suzanne Stensaas, a retired University of Utah professor of Neurobiology and Anatomy. “Greater Canyonlands is a clean air sanctuary from health-threatening air pollution for many of us living along the Wasatch Front and it helps to provide clean water for the millions of people who live downstream.”

    Read the letter here and add your name to the list of signers if you work in the health or well-being field.  Also check out the personal statements below for stories about how protecting large wild landscapes like Greater Canyonlands is vital to health and healing:

     

     

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